July 30th, 2013

Top 10 Modern Horror Stories for Young Adults

Horror has been an established literary genre for more than a century, and has seen no shortage of authors over the years. However, the roots of horror writing can be traced back to several key figures, who not only helped shape the genre, but penned some of the most iconic horror classics ever written. The following three authors are true masters of the craft, and unquestionably inspired following generations. H.P. Lovecraft Widely considered one of the 20th century’s best horror writers, Lovecraft’s popularity did in fact not expand until after his death, when he became much more popular. Lovecraft’s work often featured the themes of forbidden knowledge and the supernatural influence on his characters, who usually resided in New England and the Northeast, as did Lovecraft himself. He is well known for his prominent featuring of Cthulhu, a figure still popular with horror fans today. Edgar Allan Poe Like Lovecraft, Poe spent most of his life in New England and the Northeast. He is responsible for some of history’s most iconic horror tales and poetry, including the Raven and tThe Telltale Heart. Poe’s work often deals with interpretations of death, http://www.bestchoicetv.com, a decided fitting–albeit fitting–theme for the horror genre. Poe died young; speculations pinpoint alcoholism and general poor health throughout his adult life. Mary Shelley Although Shelley’s body of work included a wide variety of literature other than horror, her best known work is Frankenstein, arguably one of the most influential and popular horror stories ever written. Shelley was well received as a writer throughout her life, with Frankenstein becoming a popular within a few years of its publication. In modern times she is regarded under a wider lens as one of the major figures of the Romantic literary movement. Want to know more? Go ahead: Lovecraft and Religion

June 6th, 2013

The Story of Dracula

Dracula is by far the most popular vampire in literary and popular culture. Proof is with all the movies and shows that can be seen with packages found on ExpertSatellite.com/direct-tv-packages.html. Although he isn’t the first vampire in English fiction, he’s the most famous and enduring. He first appears as the title character of Bram Stoker’s 1897 novel and has since appeared in numerous movies, tv shows, and other works of popular culture. When people think of vampires, they think of Dracula, likely as portrayed by Christopher Lee or Bela Lugosi. They think of his fangs and his winged cape.

Count Dracula is several centuries old. He’s a vampire, as well as a sorcerer and nobleman from Transylvania. He claims to have descended from Attila the Hun and lives in a castle in the Carpathian Mountains. Dracula differs from the vampires of Eastern Europe, as he is attractive and charming instead of repulsive. This is a trait most vampires of popular culture share. His attractiveness makes him dangerous because his victims come willingly, at least at first.

Dracula is believed to have spent his youth (as a mortal) studying the black arts, becoming proficient in alchemy and magic. He also served in the army against the Turks. After his death and burial in his castle’s chapel, he returns each night as a vampire living with three beautiful vampire women. The exact nature of the relationship between Dracula and the female vampires isn’t known.

Dracula remained in Transylvania for centuries, planning for world domination, which he would achieve through information from Jonathan Harker–and his relocation to England. Dracula stows aboard a Russian ship and voyages to England, killing the crew for sustenance and leaving the ship in the form of a dog, proving he has shapeshifting abilities as well.

He terrorizes Jonathan’s fiance Mina and her friend Lucy, turning Lucy into a vampire and stalking Mina. Jonathan and Lucy’s former suitors enlist the help of Van Helsing, who aids them in defeating Dracula. Dracula leaves but not without biting Mina first. When he is killed in Transylvania he turns to dust, but there is an expression of peace on his face first.

Many aspects of the novel and Dracula’s character have become central to the common myths of vampires. Dracula lives on in movies, shows including “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and many other pop cultural references.

May 17th, 2013

The Vampyre, by Polidori: The First English Vampire Story

In 1816 Percy and Mary Shelley, Lord Byron, and John Polidori traveled to Switzerland. One stormy evening, they decided to have a competition to see who could write the best horror story. Mary, of course, wrote Frankenstein, and poets Shelley and Byron never finished their projects. And Polidori wrote the first important vampire story in English, The Vampyre.

Polidori’s plot revolves around young Englishman Aubrey, and the strange Lord Ruthven. They travel through Europe, where, unknown to Aubrey, Ruthven kills Aubrey’s Greek Read the rest of this entry »

March 26th, 2013

The Influence of Medieval Christianity on the Horror Genre

Medieval Christianity has played a large part in forming the battles between good and evil that take place in horror novels and film. Perhaps the most striking examples of this influence revolves around the notions of blood and of deviltry. Here is a brief description of how these two aspects have affected the world of horror:

Blood

In Medieval Christianity, as throughout the history of the Christian religion, blood is considered to be sacred. As the blood of Christ is considered holy, the horror genre enjoys twisting the idea of the life Read the rest of this entry »

August 13th, 2012

The Best Gothic Horror Stories of the 18th Century

The best Gothic horror stories of the 18th century are difficult to assess because there are so many classic gothic horror stories authored that it is difficult to account for that are truly amazing works of the 18th Century. Some of the best of the best top 10, 18th Century horror stories works would be:
. Dracula by Bram Stoker is very well known today in the 21st Century with this classic hitting the movies and television screens.
. The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole who was one of the very first noted Read the rest of this entry »

August 10th, 2012

Algernon Blackwood: The Willows and Other Horror Stories

Algernon Blackwood’s The Willows has been praised as being ahead of its time and one of the most horrifying short stories of that period. Blackwood as well as The Willows was one of H.P. Lovecraft’s favorite authors. Blackwood’s other short stories were scary and haunting but nothing compared to The Willows.

The story starts as two friends paddle their canoe down the river, as the story progresses Blackwood manages to bring a sinister quality to the elements around the two friends. Blackwood takes elements such as the sun, wind and even the river and Read the rest of this entry »

August 9th, 2012

Top 3 Best-Known Horror Stories of Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe is famous for the wide variety of poems and stories he wrote during his lifetime. Some of his most well known stories, which are still enjoyed by readers today, are his classic tales of horror. The three best known horror stories by Edgar Allan Poe are The Tell-Tale Heart, The Fall of the House of Usher and The Masque of the Red Death.

The Tell-Tale Heart is considered by many to be Edgar Allan Poe’s finest horror story. The story is unique in that it is told from the prospective of a murderer. Throughout the story Read the rest of this entry »

August 8th, 2012

Classic Horror Stories of H.P. Lovecraft

Howard Phillips Lovecraft has inspired writers such as Stephen King, Alan Moore, Clive Barker and many authors who write horror today. He specialized in sci-fi, horror, fantasy and what he called “cosmic horror.”

Lovecraft wrote about alien influences on mankind, forbidden information, threats to humanity and more. He built an entire mythology that ran through much of his work.

H.P. Lovecraft wrote novels, novellas and dozens of short stories. His extensive bibliography includes:

“The Statement of Randolph Carter” (written in 1919, short story) – inspired by Read the rest of this entry »

August 4th, 2012

The Roots of the Genre: 3 Classic Horror Authors

Horror has been an established literary genre for more than a century, and has seen no shortage of authors over the years. However, the roots of horror writing can be traced back to several key figures, who not only helped shape the genre, but penned some of the most iconic horror classics ever written. The following three authors are true masters of the craft, and unquestionably inspired following generations.

H.P. Lovecraft

Widely considered one of the 20th century’s best horror writers, Lovecraft’s popularity did in fact not expand until after his death, when he became much Read the rest of this entry »